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Mid-Year Reading Check-In: How To Evaluate Your Current Reading Life and Goals

Learn strategies for setting or adjusting your reading goals and more!

Mid-Year Reading Check-In: How To Evaluate Your Reading Life and Adjust or Make New Goals

We’re already halfway through the year, and it’s time for a reading check-in.  How are things going with your current reading life?  Are you on track to meet your reading goals?  Or have things changed so much that you need to adjust, completely reset or make new goals?  This article will help you evaluate your current reading life and set or adjust your reading goals as needed.  Let’s get started!

 

Step # One: Evaluate your current reading life.

The first step in evaluating your current reading life is revisiting the reading goal, resolution, or intention you set for yourself at the beginning of the year.  Whether you intended only to read books written by women or resolved to read two books a month, look back and see if you are currently on track to achieve your reading resolution or intention.

Other questions you should ask yourself as you’re evaluating your reading life are:

– Have you been successfully finding time to read?

– How much time have you devoted to reading?

– What type of books have you been reading?

– Are you enjoying the books you’re reading?

– Are you satisfied with your current reading life?

If you are on track to achieving your reading goal, resolution, or intention, then great!  Keep up the excellent work.  But if the answer is no, maybe, or you’re not sure, don’t worry.  We’ll help you reset or make new goals so that by the end of the year, you can confidently say that you’ve achieved your resolution or intention.

RELATED:

To quickly evaluate and get an accurate picture of your reading life, you need to track your reading.  If you’re new to tracking your reading or looking for ways to improve, check out our “5 Ways To Track Your Reading” and “7 Things We Are Tracking In Our Reading Journal” articles, and if you’re looking for an app to track your reading, check out “The 5 Best Book Tracking Apps for Readers” article.

Mid-Year Reading Check-In: Keep track of your reading progress

Step # Two: Reset, adjust or make new reading goals.

If, upon reflection, you decide that you would like to reset, adjust or make new reading goals, that’s perfectly fine.  The most important thing is you’re taking the time to do a mid-year check-in and ensure that your reading goals are still relevant and achievable.

RESETTING YOUR READING GOALS

If you’re still sticking to your initial reading goal, resolution, or intention, but you need a reset to feel inspired and get back on track, here are some things you can consider:

– Changing up your reading routine.

– Switch things up and read in a different format, such as audiobooks or ebooks.

– Find a reading buddy or join a book club.

– Take some time to declutter your physical and digital bookshelves.

– Visit your local library or bookstore and get personalized recommendations.

– Set the mood and create a cozy reading atmosphere tailored just for you.

RELATED:

Check out our “10 Tips to Revitalize and Have a More Fulfilling Reading Life” article.

ADJUSTING YOUR READING GOALS

If your goal was to read more books, but you’re finding that you’re not enjoying the process, it might be time to adjust your goal.  Instead of setting a number-based goal, try setting a quality-based goal, such as reading one book that you’re looking forward to per month or reading books that are outside your comfort zone.

If you decide that you need to adjust your reading goal, here are some things to consider:

– Make sure that your goal is still relevant and achievable.

– If you’re not on track to meeting your original goals, try readjusting them to be more achievable.

– Break down your goals into smaller, more manageable pieces.

– Create a timeline for yourself.

MAKING NEW READING GOALS

Making new goals is perfectly fine too!  If your circumstances have changed or you’re simply not feeling motivated by your current goals, it might be time to set new ones.  When making new goals, try to be as specific as possible so that you can easily track and measure your progress.

Some examples of specific reading goals are:

– Read one book per month that is outside of your comfort zone.

– Start and finish reading a book within a week.

– Read two books per week.

Other things to keep in mind as you’re setting your new reading goals:

– What do you want to achieve by the end of the year?

– What type of books do you want to read?

– How much time are you willing to commit to reading?

– Do I prefer specific goals or something more open-ended that allows more flexibility?

Above all, set realistic and achievable goals.

Now that you know what kind of goals you would like to set, it’s essential to ensure they are realistic and achievable.  For example, there’s no point in setting a goal to read 100 books in the next six months if you know that’s impossible given your current reading habits and lifestyle.  Not only will you be setting yourself up for disappointment, but you’ll also be less likely to stick to your reading goals.

RELATED:

Check out our tips, resources, and practical tips to help you set and achieve your reading goals and resolutions in our “How To Set and Achieve Your Reading Goals and Resolutions” article

Evaluate Your Reading Life and Adjust or Make New Goals

Step # Three: Come up with a plan.

The third step in resetting, adjusting, or making new reading goals is creating a plan of action.  This means that you need to sit down and figure out how you will achieve your reading goals.  For example, if your goal is to read more books, how many books do you want or need to read?  If your goal is to read a specific type of book, where will you find these books?

Coming up with a plan of action will look different for everyone, but here are some things to keep in mind:

– What resources do I need?

– What type of books am I looking for?

– How many books do I want or need to read?

– When do I want or need to read these books by?

– Do my reading goals fit into my current lifestyle and schedule?

– How much time can you realistically devote to reading?

After you’ve answered these questions, you can start creating a plan to help you reset, adjust, or make new reading goals.  This might mean setting aside time each day or week to read, visiting your local library more often, or signing up for a book club.

RELATED:

Check out our tips, resources, and practical tips to help you set and achieve your reading goals and resolutions in our “How To Set and Achieve Your Reading Goals and Resolutions” article

Mid-Year Reading Check-In: Come up with a reading plan

Step # Four: Keep track of your progress.

The fourth step in resetting, adjusting, or making new reading goals is to keep track of your progress.  You can do this in several ways, such as keeping a reading journal, using a reading tracker app, or simply writing down the books you read each month in a notebook.

Keeping track of your progress allows you to see how well you’re meeting your goals and helps keep you accountable.  For example, if you know that you need to read two books per week and only end up reading one, this gives you something to work on for the following week.

No matter how you keep track of your progress, it is important to do it in a way that works for you and helps keep you accountable.

RELATED:

To quickly evaluate and get an accurate picture of your reading life, you need to track your reading.  If you’re new to tracking your reading or looking for ways to improve, check out our “5 Ways To Track Your Reading” and “7 Things We Are Tracking In Our Reading Journal” article if you’re looking for an app to track your reading, check out “The 5 Best Book Tracking Apps for Readers” article.

Mid-Year Reading Check-In: Reset, adjust or make new reading goals

Step # Four: Keep track of your progress.

The fourth step in resetting, adjusting, or making new reading goals is to keep track of your progress.  You can do this in several ways, such as keeping a reading journal, using a reading tracker app, or simply writing down the books you read each month in a notebook.

Keeping track of your progress allows you to see how well you’re meeting your goals and helps keep you accountable.  For example, if you know that you need to read two books per week and only end up reading one, this gives you something to work on for the following week.

No matter how you keep track of your progress, it is important to do it in a way that works for you and helps keep you accountable.

RELATED:

To quickly evaluate and get an accurate picture of your reading life, you need to track your reading.  If you’re new to tracking your reading or looking for ways to improve, check out our “5 Ways To Track Your Reading” and “7 Things We Are Tracking In Our Reading Journal” article if you’re looking for an app to track your reading, check out “The 5 Best Book Tracking Apps for Readers” article.

Mid-Year Reading Check-In: Evaluate your current reading life

Step # Five: Get started and enjoy the process!

The final step is to get started and enjoy the process.  Reading should be enjoyable, so don’t put too much pressure on yourself to achieve your goals overnight.  Instead, take your time and find what works for you.  If reading starts to feel like a chore, take a break or switch up your plans.  The point of reading is to enjoy it, so make sure that your goals reflect that.

If you’re struggling to find ways to have fun while reading, here are some ideas:

– Read with friends or family members.

– Join a book club.

– Start a reading challenge.

– Try out different genres.

– Visit your local library or bookstore.

No matter your reading goals, the important thing is that you enjoy the process and find ways to have fun!

Do you have any reading goals or resolutions?  Do you have any tips or tricks that would benefit other readers?

Reading is such a personal activity, and what works for one person might not work for another, so we’re always curious to hear about different approaches to reading.

Do you have any other tips for how to do a mid-year reading check-in or reset reading goals?  Share them, and let’s talk about it all in the comments.

Mid-Year Reading Check-In

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