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30 Must-Read Classics by Women Writers

Historically men have dominated the canon of classic literature, and for centuries, the talent of women writers was not recognized or celebrated.  But the truth is women have been writing great books for centuries, and you could probably spend a lifetime just reading great classics by women and never run out of reading material.

While this list is just a dent in classics books written by women authors, you’re bound to find something on this list to pique your interest.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Austen’s most popular novel, the unforgettable story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy.

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

A luminous and haunting novel about Janie Crawford, a Southern black woman in the 1930s whose journey from a free-spirited girl to a woman of independence and substance.

The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson

The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson

A classic work of short fiction, a story remarkable for its combination of subtle suspense and pitch-perfect descriptions of both the chilling and the mundane.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

A masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep South–and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred.

Kindred by Octavia E Butler

Kindred by Octavia E Butler

The visionary author’s masterpiece pulls us–along with her Black female hero–through time to face the horrors of slavery and explore the impacts of racism, sexism, and white supremacy then and now.

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

The groundbreaking depiction of a woman who dares to defy the expectations of society in the pursuit of her desire.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

A novel of intense power and intrigue, Jane Eyre has dazzled generations of readers with its depiction of a woman’s quest for freedom.

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

In this vivid portrait of a single day in a woman’s life, Mrs. Clarissa Dalloway is preoccupied with the last-minute details of preparation for a party while in her mind she is something much more than a perfect society hostess.

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

This Gothic-style romance is among the first of true science fiction novels, if not the first. A young scientist named Victor Frankenstein, after going through his own near-death experience, decides to play God and create life in the form of a grotesque creature, which turns into a nightmare.

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. And Sethe’s new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

In Margaret Atwood’s dystopian future, environmental disasters and declining birthrates have led to a Second American Civil War. The result is the rise of the Republic of Gilead, a totalitarian regime that enforces rigid social roles and enslaves the few remaining fertile women.

Middlemarch by George Eliot

Middlemarch by George Eliot

George Eliot’s most ambitious novel is a masterly evocation of diverse lives and changing fortunes in a provincial community.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

The Bell Jar chronicles the crack-up of Esther Greenwood: brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under–maybe for the last time.

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence, is both a poignant story of frustrated love and an extraordinarily vivid, delightfully satirical record of a vanished world.

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

A powerful cultural touchstone of modern American literature, The Color Purple depicts the lives of African American women in early twentieth-century rural Georgia. Separated as girls, sisters Celie and Nettie sustain their loyalty to and hope in each other across time, distance and silence.

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Last Night I Dreamt I went to Manderley Again…

With these words, the reader is ushered into an isolated gray stone mansion on the windswept Cornish coast, as the second Mrs. Maxim de Winter recalls the chilling events that transpired as she began her new life as the young bride of a husband she barely knew.

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. Without a shred of doubt, one of his fellow passengers is the murderer.

The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

The most famous work of Japanese literature and the world’s first novel–written a thousand years ago and one of the enduring classics of world literature.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide.

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House has been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of a haunting; Theodora, his lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a friendless, fragile young woman well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the future heir of Hill House.

Passing by Nella Larsen

Passing by Nella Larsen

Clare Kendry is living on the edge. Light-skinned, elegant, and ambitious, she is married to a racist white man unaware of her African American heritage, and has severed all ties to her past after deciding to pass as a white woman. Clare’s childhood friend, Irene Redfield, just as light-skinned, has chosen to remain within the African American community, and is simultaneously allured and repelled by Clare’s risky decision to engage in racial masquerade for personal and societal gain.

The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickenson

The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickenson

Only eleven of Emily Dickinson’s poems were published prior to her death in 1886; the startling originality of her work doomed it to obscurity in her lifetime. Not until the 1955 publication of The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, a three-volume critical edition was compiled. This book, a distillation of the three-volume Complete Poems, brings together the original texts of all 1,775 poems that Emily Dickinson wrote.

My Ántonia by Willa Cather

My Ántonia by Willa Cather

My Ántonia is considered one of the most significant American novels of the twentieth century. Set during the great migration west to settle the plains of the North American continent, the narrative follows Antonia Shimerda, a pioneer who comes to Nebraska as a child and grows with the country, inspiring a childhood friend, Jim Burden, to write her life story.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Wonderfully sardonic and slyly humorous, the writings of landmark American feminist and socialist thinker Charlotte Perkins Gilman were penned in response to her frustrations with the gender-based double standard that prevailed in America as the twentieth century began.

Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

The classic Anne of Green Gables; where Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom’s Cabin was revolutionary in 1852 for its passionate indictment of slavery and for its presentation of Tom, a man of humanity, as the first black hero in American fiction. Labeled racist and condescending by some contemporary critics, it remains a shocking, controversial, and powerful work — exposing the attitudes of white nineteenth-century society toward the peculiar institution and documenting, in heartrending detail, the tragic breakup of black Kentucky families sold down the river.

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

As relevant now as when it was first published, Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South skilfully weaves a compelling love story into a clash between the pursuit of profit and humanitarian ideals.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

In this charged collection of fifteen essays and speeches, Lorde takes on sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, and class, and propounds social difference as a vehicle for action and change. Her prose is incisive, unflinching, and lyrical, reflecting struggle but ultimately offering messages of hope.

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

Indeed Lorraine Hansberry’s award-winning drama about the hopes and aspirations of a struggling, working-class family living on the South Side of Chicago connected profoundly with the psyche of black America–and changed American theater forever. The play’s title comes from a line in Langston Hughes’s poem Harlem, which warns that a dream deferred might dry up/like a raisin in the sun.

What do you think about the books on this list?

Have you read any of the books on this list?  What are some of your favorite books written by women authors?  What books would you add to the list?

Comments (1)

  • Ruth

    THANK YOU for posting a diverse and inclusive list!

    reply

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